In Dominican Republic, Fishing Community Gets Help from ADRA

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June 28, 2018

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New dock, part of ongoing efforts to assist people still recovering from Hurricane Irma.
By: Wilkin Santana, Inter-American Division News

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The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) in the Dominican Republic recently finished the construction of a boat dock, built to help the family-owned fishing businesses in the Boba community of Maria Trinidad Sanchez Province. Thirty homes were destroyed and dozens of lives affected when a tidal wave caused by Hurricane Irma hit the coastal community in September 2017.
In addition to the boat dock, ADRA has been rebuilding dozens of homes and has provided two fishing boats. ADRA will help complete the rebuilding of two more homes in July 2018 and will continue to provide water, food vouchers, and other relief supplies to people in the area.

 

The new dock will assist more than 65 fishermen in the Boba community to unload their catch, as well as provide a place to launch rides for tourists who visit the region. [Photo: ADRA Dominican Republic]

ADRA Dominican Republic director Roberto Matos presents the new boat dock to the president of the Association of Fishermen in the Boba community during a brief ceremony in María Trinidad Sánchez Province, in the northern part of Dominican Republic, on June 7, 2018. [Photo: ADRA Dominican Republic]

The new dock will assist more than 65 fishermen in the Boba community to unload their catch, as well as provide a place to launch rides for tourists who visit the region. [Photo: ADRA Dominican Republic]

ADRA Dominican Republic director Roberto Matos presents the new boat dock to the president of the Association of Fishermen in the Boba community during a brief ceremony in María Trinidad Sánchez Province, in the northern part of Dominican Republic, on June 7, 2018. [Photo: ADRA Dominican Republic]

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“ADRA has been assisting more than 133 families with food vouchers in an effort to help families in the aftermath of the hurricane and boost the local economy,” said Roberto Matos, ADRA Dominican Republic director. “These fishermen lost their way of supporting their families, and local tourism was affected. So after learning more about assisting their needs, ADRA oversaw the project for the community.”
Government and community leaders welcomed the initiative and thanked ADRA and its volunteers for invaluable assistance during a short launching ceremony held earlier this month.
“You have taken a big load off,” said Arsenio Martínez, representative of the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources, as he thanked ADRA and the church for the boat dock. “Two previous docks were destroyed twice by storms, but this one for sure will last longer.”
ADRA made the dock movable so it can be removed and protected in the case of a storm threatening the area, said Matos.
“ADRA is happy to be part of helping families in the aftermath of emergency situations like this one,” said Matos as he presented the dock to the president of the Association of Fishermen in the Boba community.

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Survivor Turkey cameraman murdered in Dominican Republic

 

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NewsWorld
June 28 2018 09:46:45
SANTO DOMINGO
Survivor Turkey cameraman murdered in Dominican Republic

A cameraman working for the Turkish version of Survivor, a reality competition television franchise, was killed by two assailants in Dominican Republic’s Las Terrenas town on June 27, the show’s producer Acun Ilıcalı confirmed.

According to Turkish media reports, Alper Aycın was attacked in the street by two muggers who attempted to steal his bag when the cameraman left his workplace after filming on June 27.

Aycın reportedly resisted and was stabbed in the heart.

The young cameraman died at the scene.

Dominican police detained the assailants after they fled.

“I can’t describe our pain and sorrow with words. May heaven be your home, my brother,” Ilıcalı said in a tweet, condemning the “heinous attack.”

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Crime Cartels Revive Caribbean Cocaine Pipeline

By InSight Crime | May 25, 2018

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Photo by Marco Verch via Flickr

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As cocaine pours largely unopposed across the border from Colombia, with production in the Andean nation at a record high, organized crime has developed one of the region’s most prolific drug pipelines into the Dominican Republic.
While there are some illegal flights that swing past, the lion’s share of the drug streaks across the Caribbean in go-fast boats. The Dominican Republic offers the drug trade some of the Caribbean’s biggest container ports, a lively tourist sector with commercial flights across the globe, and a booming property and banking sector, ready to wash narco-dollars.

The Caribbean route had fallen from favor since the heady days of the Medellín Cartel, when Pablo Escobar and his associates used the island of Norman’s Cay in the Bahamas to refuel the planes laden with cocaine, bound for the United States. In the mid-1980s, over 75 percent of the cocaine seized on its way to the United States was taken in the Caribbean.

By 2010, that number was down to 10 percent, and Central America was registering over 80 percent of seizures.

The reason for the resurgence in the Caribbean is explained by two factors: increased US investment in the drug war in Central America and Mexico, and the growing importance of Venezuela as a regional cocaine hub.
The United States has dedicated resources via the Mérida Initiative in Mexico, which began in 2008, and the Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI), which has been pumping money principally into the Northern Triangle nations of El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.
This has also had an effect on the cocaine air bridge from Venezuela to Honduras, pushing more drug consignments onto the high seas of the Caribbean. (For more information on this, see InSight Crime’s investigation “Honduras and Venezuela: Coup and Cocaine Air Bridge”).

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